Pets, Cars & Heat

Pets, Cars & Heat

Brutus, Duke, Coco, Lola and Jake…sure, they’re fairly common pet names, but they’re also the names of just a few of the pets that died last year because they were left in cars on warm (and not necessarily hot) days while their owners were shopping, visiting friends or family, or running errands. What’s so tragic is that these beloved pets were simply the victims of bad judgment.Want numbers? An independent study showed that the interior temperature of vehicles parked in outside temperatures ranging from 72 to 96° F rose steadily as time increased. (And cracking the windows doesn’t help).

To learn more, go to: https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/Hot-Cars-and-Loose-Pets.aspx

National Pet Identification Week

It’s National Pet Identification Week — the perfect time to make sure you’ve taken every precaution to be reunited with your pet if he or she becomes lost. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) recently found that only 33 percent of pet parents admitted to always having ID tags on their dogs and cats.In addition to that crucial step, pet owners should also have their furry friend microchipped. Collars with pet identification are accessible to anyone who finds your lost pet. But, tags can become hard to read, and collars can be broken or removed. Microchipping your pet is a method of permanent identification. Microchips cannot be easily misread, and the permanent identification number is tamperproof. The information about the pet and owner is usually readily retrievable.A microchip is a very tiny transponder that is encoded with a unique identification number. Before insertion, the sterile microchip is scanned in the package to confirm that the identification code of the transponder matches that shown on the label of the bar code on the package.

Credit: Web Vet

CAUTION: Lilies can be highly dangerous to cats!

CAUTION: Lilies can be highly dangerous to cats!

Easter is this weekend and we want to remind you about lilies being VERY dangerous to cats. To be safe we recommend that all cat owners avoid lilies altogether, both inside and out. The potentially fatal lilies are true lilies, including Tiger, Day, Asiatic, Easter, and Japanese Show lilies. These are all highly toxic to cats. Even small ingestions (such as chewing on the pollen, petals or leaves) can result in kidney failure and death. Some other varieties of lilies are a little more benign: Peace, Peruvian, and Calla lilies contain oxalate crystals that cause minor signs of illness, such as tissue irritation in the mouth, tongue, pharynx, and esophagus, which, in turn, causes minor drooling. Much the same as the more commonly recognized danger of poinsettias. Cats that consume any part of a lily require immediate medical care to effectively treat the poisoning. If you see your cat eating, or even chewing on a lily, you should contact your veterinarian immediately. Swift treatment and decontamination is imperative in the early toxic stage. Additionally, aggressive intravenous fluid therapy, kidney-function monitoring tests, and supportive care can greatly improve prognoses. Please share this important information with all of your cat loving friends.

What is Lyme Disease?

What is Lyme Disease?

Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks; laboratory testing is helpful if used correctly and performed with validated methods. Most cases of Lyme disease can be treated successfully with a few weeks of antibiotics. Steps to prevent Lyme disease include using insect repellent, removing ticks promptly, applying pesticides, and reducing tick habitat. The ticks that transmit Lyme disease can occasionally transmit other tickborne diseases as well.

To learn more, go to: www.cdc.gov/lyme/

Sadie the Easter Bunny

Sadie girl loved coming to get her pet therapy and posing for the camera!

Weather Update for March 3rd

Due to the storm, we will be closed today.  Be careful!

Weather Update for Thursday 2/13/14

Due to the storm, Paradise Animal Hospital will open today, Thursday, Feb 13th, at noon. Please be careful!

Dog Bites

Millions of people – most of them children – are bitten by dogs every year in the United States. The majority of these bites, if not all, are preventable.  Here are some basic facts that might surprise even you from our friends at the AVMA.

Dog Bite AVMA

February is National Pet Dental Health Month

Don’t turn your nose to Fido’s or Fluffy’s bad breath! That odor might signify a serious health risk, with the potential to damage not only your pet’s teeth and gums but its internal organs as well.

To address the significance of oral health care for pets, the AVMA and several veterinary groups are sponsoring National Pet Dental Health Month in February.

Starting in February we will be sharing information about how you can identify pet dental health problems and how you can proactively minimize the risk of them occurring.  Stay tuned!

Due to the storm, our Wednesday hours are as follows:

Our surgery schedule will be delayed by two hours this morning. 7:00am drop offs will be rescheduled for 9:00am. We will keep you updated about other scheduling changes.

Be careful!