Baltimore Humane Society Wish List

Baltimore Humane Society Wish List

For more information, go to: www.bmorehumane.org

Pets for Patriots

The Baltimore Humane Society is a proud adoption partner of Pets for Patriots, a nationally operating 501(c)(3) charity creating opportunitites for veterans and service members to save hard-to-adopt shelter pets.  To learn more, go to: http://petsforpatriots.org/

Be on the Lookout for our Donation Boxes!

Mama is ready to start collecting donations!! We have three different locations this year!

Wish lists are at all three locations and will be on facebook shortly ( www.facebook.com/caninerehab)
The local shelters your donations will be going to are: Monty’s Mates Bulldog Rescue Small Miracles Cat and Dog Rescue Alley Animals, Md SPCA and Baltimore Humane Society
A BIG THANK YOU goes out to all who participate!! Your thoughtfulness is greatly appreciated!

Rocco’s Pet Therapy

Rocco LOVES spending time outside with his favorite therapy ladies!

November 18 is the kick off date to our annual donation box!

Its almost here!!!!
November 18 is the kick off date to our annual donation box!
Boxes will be at 3 different locations this year!
We are trying to make this year BIGGER and BETTER!!!

Boxes will be placed here at Paradise, Eldersburg Vet Hospital and Old Court Animal Hospital!
Wish list and Animal Shelters/Rescues will be posted soon!!!
You have until January 4th to get your donations in!!!

Thanks for all your support!!

Maryland Dog Magazine

Ask the Vet appears in Maryland Dog Magazine. Dr. Burke is a regular contributor.

Ask the Vet, have a confession to make. This is not a response to an inquisitive reader’s question. This article is in response to the questions that clients pose to our veterinary staff every day. “Should I bring my dog in?” “What could it be?” “Can it wait until morning?” I reviewed the most common telephone emergency calls and have attempted to organize some advice for dog owners.

EMERGENCY 911:
Can it wait until the morning?

The decision to take your dog to your veterinarian on an emergency basis is always a difficult one. There are financial, emotional and medical concerns. Emergency care for a life threatening situation can be expensive. Inadequate or delayed care for a life threatening situation may well cost even more—your dog’s life. Our ability to advise you on the telephone and your ability to make a physical assessment of your dog’s condition
is dependent upon a familiarity with your dog’s normal physical status. How does he breathe? How many times per minute? How does his chest rise and fall? Is his mouth open or closed? What color is his tongue, his lips, his gums? How does he act? What is his normal appetite; his stool character, his urine volume and frequency? As a concerned dog owner, you should know your dog’s normal pulse, respiration rate, gum color and
attitude.

Basic first aid can keep your dog stable as you prepare to transport to a veterinary hospital. It is not a replacement for veterinary care. If your dog is irrational or injured, muzzle them before you move them. A very small dog can be wrapped in a blanket or towel. A larger dog should have his mouth tied gently shut with a leash, a cord, tape or a leash. There are some excellent first aid references on the internet. I have been impressed with the veterinarypartner.com website as well as the avma.org website. The ASPCA animal poison control is a terrific resource. I encourage you to visit and review this material as it is far more complete than I can provide in this limited space. I have put the information in a table form with the thought that perhaps it will end up on your refrigerator as a reference. When in doubt, trust your instincts and seek veterinary care.
I have a confession to make. This is not a response to an inquisitive reader’s question. This article is in response to the questions that clients pose to our veterinary staff every day. “Should I bring my dog in?” “What could it be?” “Can it wait until morning?” I reviewed the most common telephone emergency calls and have attempted to organize some advice for dog owners.

CHERYL BURKE, DVM, CCRP is the proud owner of Paradise Animal Hospital for the past 22 years, practicing companion animal medicine and canine rehabilitation in her hometown community. To reach Dr. Burke or Paradise Animal Hospital call 410-744-4224, or visit www.paradiseanimalhospital.com
– See more at: http://www.marylanddogmag.com/articles/issues/fall2013/ask_the_vet.html#sthash.Ig3T6m4E.dpuf

A Police Officer is Here for Therapy

Check out Jasmine the K9 Bully Cop!